My favorite quotes from my current Reads

We are now in the second half of Latinx heritage month, and I’ve finished one book on tbr. I may have gotten sidetracked by reading the Venatrix Chronicles (review to come), which has lots of action and adventure that I abandoned my current reads.

Blazewrath Games was amazing and immediately after I picked up Incendiary but the novel wasn’t as fast paced as I liked so I then picked up Lobizona which was more my speed. As I’m slowly making my way through both novels I’ve decided to share some of my favorite quotes from both.

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Latinx heritage Month Reads 2021

Leaves are falling, sunflowers are blooming, and the smell of pumpkin spice is in the air. Fall brings delicious snacks and the excuse to watch Over the Garden Wall. 

But before Fall is officially on the calendar, there’s a special month-long celebration known as Latinx heritage month. Like many book bloggers, I’m going to dedicate this month to reading books by latinx/latine authors. 

However, as we are on the eve of spooky season, I will also slip in some paranormal literature novels too.

Curious about the origins of Hispanic heritage month and why I emphasize this an Latinx celebration? Check out the page on the U.S government’s website.

*This post contains affiliate links. I receive a commission if you complete a purchase through one of my links.

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You had me at Hola

I’ve been reading so much fantasy literature these past months that I decided to dig deep into my Tbr for a novel I’ve been neglecting.

You had me at Hola by Alexis Daria is a romantic comedy told in a dual perspective and has a telenovela flare. This novel was not only funny but features great romantic tension and a few steamy sex scenes. 

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From DNF to Done: I review We Unleash this Merciless Storm

Yes, I did it! I finally finished We Unleash this Merciless Storm. Originally I began this novel last summer, but to be honest, I wasn’t much in the mood to read it. But then I said forget it let’s dive in!

We Unleash this Merciless Storm is the Sequel to Tehlor Kay Mejia’s We Set the Dark on Fire (Here’s my review for that novel). Set immediately after the previous novel, explosive ending, We Unleash this Merciless Storm gives readers a change in perspective. 

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Nocturna: or two idiots fall in love in Latin America

Hello booklovers! Today’s review is an idiots to lovers story courtesy of romantic prince and a stubborn theif, That’s right today am reviewing Nocturna by Maya Motayne. 

Nocturna is Maya Motayne’s debut novel and the first in the Forgery of Magic series. This series is high fantasy, set in Latin America, and contains lots of magic.

*This post contains affiliate links. If you complete a purchase through one of my links I earn a small commission.

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My favorite quotes in Historically Inaccurate

Today is my stop on the Historically Inaccurate book tour! I received this arc from the team at Colored Pages Bookish Tour. Check them out if you’re a fellow book blogger.

Historically Inaccurate by Shay Bravo is a new adult fiction novel that’s out everywhere September 29.

Soledad just wants things to go back to normal after her mother’s deportation she’s had to move homes, switch schools, and adjust to life without her. When Sol decides to join her College’s history club she doesn’t expect to have to sneak into a house and steal a fork. However, Sol is caught by Ethan Winston a resident of the house and the chance encounter forever changes her life.

To celebrate it’s release I thought I turn some of my favorite quotes into graphics that you may download if you please.

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Latinx TBR Wrap-Up

As Latinx heritage month comes to a close I thought I would share my thoughts on the books I have read for this month.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Don’t Date Rosa Santos has a special place in my heart. I really loved this book because of it’s small town setting. Because Rosa grows up in Port Corral she knows everyone in town and is a very helpful neighbor. The small town in this book reminded me of Star Hallows and I hope to someday find a small town like this. Additionally, the fact that the love interest Alex is both a sailor and a baker made me just as happy.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

We Set the Dark on Fire is a book that I didn’t know I needed into my life until I read it. A dystopian, romance and spy narrative, We Set the Dark on Fire is all of these things. I really loved this because the main character Dani is such a bad bitch! Dani really tries to follow the rules of her society but when her husband decides he rather have a trophy wife and not an equal it really pushes Dani to turn against him. I really can’t wait to see what the next book has to offer.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Bruja Born is a book that I began reading at the beginning of the year was able to finish. Jumping back into this book was not difficult I love the world that Cordova has created and I will definitely read more of her books in the future.

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Isabel Allende writing is beautiful and captivating. I loved the Trueba women in the house of the spirits especially Clara and her unknown dog/wolf/ mythical being hybrid Barrabas. That being said The House of the Spirits was not the book for me I really wanted to love this book and maybe I would have if Esteban wasn’t so much of a caca head.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Corazón was a book that felt like coming home. I loved Salgado’s descriptive writing and the little anecdotes of her daily life that she turns into poetry. I love the way that Yesika chose to share her corner of Los Angles with nostalgia and to what it is today.


After spending a whole month reading nothing but books written by Latinx authors I noticed that the border was a common theme between all these books. Even though Bruja Born and and We set the Dark on Fire are both fantasy novel there was still this presence of a border.

Although the border theme in Bruja Born is not presence in a way that one would conventional think. I argue that it is still very much presence. The supernatural creatures in this novel must not reveal themselves to humans, instead the brujas practice in secret. In this sense the Mortiz sister split themselves away from what they are as brujas in order to not draw attention to themselves. On top of that, the Mortiz family is latinx and also experience the struggles as people of color.

We Set the Dark Fire interweaves the border narrative into the novel with characters who have had to cross a border into Medio for better opportunities. However, during this crossing one of the characters witnessing something extremely traumatic while the other character remembers her own crossing and they both bond over it.

Rosa Santos lives with the small snippets that her grandmother has shared with her of Cuba and as she enters adulthood she dreams of one day visiting the Island that caused so much joy and sorrow for her family.

When a dictator takes control in Chile, Blanca and Pedro flee the country because it is no longer safe for Pedro, a communist sympathizer, to live there. Additionally, Alba is also given the opportunity to flee her country she decides to stay even though she is in danger as well.

Lastly, Salgado’s Corazón yearns for a El Salvador from her memories and a Silverlake before it was gentrified. Salgado remembers eating mangos in El Salvador and later eating them with her lover this common link between both countries is not coincidental. I believe Salgado links them together to highlight the longing for El Salvador.


This border theme is saddening and highlights that border trauma is something that runs through generations. After discovering this link between the novels I was reminded of Gloria Anzaldua’s Borderlands. In this book, Anzaldua offers many great points that resonated with me but the one quote that has stuck with me is as follows:

“The U.S-Mexican border es una herida abierta where the Third World grates against the first and bleeds. And before a scab forms it hemorrhages again, the lifeblood of two worlds merging to form a third country — a border culture.”

Gloria Anzaldúa Borderlands/ La frontera: The New Mestiza

Have you noticed this theme or other themes during Latinx heritage month? If so leave your thoughts below in the comments I would love to read them.

Until next time continue living in libros,

Gaby

Corazón

I have been following Yesika Salgado since the release of Corazón. I loved Yesika’s personality and the small snippets of poems she shared on her Instagram, convinced me that I needed to add this book to my list. A few years pass, I find copies of Corazón at my college bookstore and contemplate buying a copy. I decide not to. Yesika releases Tesoro in 2018 and Hermosa this year.

Finally, I decide to purchase Corazón after catching a sale in September. And I wish I had read it while I was in college and yearning for Latinx voices in literature.

Corazón contains a collection of love poems ranging from ex-lovers, family, loss, El Salvador, and Yesika’s life in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Silverlake. But most importantly, Corazón explores Yesika’s life as a fat, brown, Salvadorean, poet. Yesika provides a very unique and much-needed voice to poetry.

The majority of Corazón’s poems deal with ex-lovers ranging from fuck boys to happy and hard moments in relationships. However, Corazón did not speak to me on the romantic level.

I have never had to heal from a breakup, nor have I spent nights missing an ex, however, the nostalgic elements of Corazón, touched my heart. These moments include drinking café con conchas, watching parents carefully slice thorns off of nopales, and even picking Mangos at a grandparent’s house. These are all moments I have of my childhood. Although Yesika’s memories are of Salvador, and mine is of Mexico, I think this resemblance in our lives is pretty cool. 

One of the reasons I loved Corazón, was that Yesika has a way of capturing moments that make you feel like you lived through them too.

By dividing Corazón into different sections, poems follow Yesika’s path to heal herself. In this sense Corazón is very similar to Rupi Kaur’s, “Milk and Honey” and for fans of that collection I would recommend Corazón.

Until next time continue living in libros,

Gaby